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  • Gertrude Lyons

    Dr. Gertrude Lyons is a Master Life Coach, Relationship Expert, and Director of Family Programs for The Wright Foundation with over 20 years of experience. Through her Rewriting The Mother Code initiative, which challenges the traditional notions of motherhood and womanhood, Dr. Lyons has become a national mothering revolutionary. An NPN member since 1998, Gertrude and her husband, Rich, raised their two daughters Morgan (24) and Hannah (22) in the Andersonville neighborhood.



    Gertrude Lyons

    Dr. Gertrude Lyons is a Master Life Coach, Relationship Expert, and Director of Family Programs for The Wright Foundation with over 20 years of experience. Through her Rewriting The Mother Code initiative, which challenges the traditional notions of motherhood and womanhood, Dr. Lyons has become a national mothering revolutionary. An NPN member since 1998, Gertrude and her husband, Rich, raised their two daughters Morgan (24) and Hannah (22) in the Andersonville neighborhood.

    What does Mother's Day mean in 2021?

    Given the challenges for mothers and all caregivers in this pandemic, will it be any different this year?

    Mother's Day is such a loaded holiday for lots of reasons — often tied to traditions set in place to honor our own mothers. But like it did in 2020, this Mother’s Day isn’t “normal.” Will it be any different this year? Or is it something that you're looking forward to because it's predictable? Given the challenges and victories for mothers and all caregivers who continue to prevail in this pandemic, I believe it’s a perfect time to expose and disrupt the status quo. 

    Starting with Mother’s Day. Do you know its origin?

    It started as an anti-war movement in the 1850s. In 1870, Julia Ward Howe — composer of "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" — issued a widely read "Mother's Day Proclamation" calling for women to take an active political role in promoting peace. Ultimately, in 1914 Anna Jarvis was successful in her campaign to have the day dedicated to appreciating your own mother when President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed it a national holiday. 

    [Related: Mother's Day ideas for Chicago moms]

    Unfortunately, Jarvis lost her second battle which was to keep the holiday out of the hands of consumerism. Speaking of which, how much do you think we spend on Mother’s Day? Made up mostly of greeting cards, flowers, and social outings, Americans spent $26.7 billion dollars on Mother’s day in 2020. Does the 7% spending increase (in the throes of a pandemic) from 2019 and the 45% increase from 2010 translate to a mothers' increased fulfillment and satisfaction in the day? 

    Well, that is for each individual mother to decide. 

    Let’s look at it another way that might spark your interest. Just as you are the author and director of your pleasure in all spheres of your life (wink, wink), so too are you ultimately responsible for your own “MOM-GASM!” I may be stretching it a bit with the metaphor, but the possibility for a day where everything from time with yourself to experiences with others brings you delight.

    [Related: To the mom missing her dad on Father's Day]

    The sky's the limit, but the key is to make it your own. Map out your day, and if you want it a certain way, you have to ask for it — your family cannot read your mind. While lovely to receive gifts and acknowledgment, one day won’t refuel you from a year of incredible stress and increased hours of unpaid labor. But you deserve to design a lovely day. 

    As women, we are generally great at caring for others, but not so adept with mothering ourselves. Empower yourself this Mother’s Day to disrupt old paradigms that do not serve you, and create a vision or intention for yourself. It’s not selfish, nor does it take away from the day to communicate your wishes and set the tone. 

    While hardly exhaustive, I offer a few ideas to get your started:
    • Do some research on May day/Mother’s day in different cultures.
    • Create your own “ritual” or devotion for the day that you may carry forward.
    • Inventory all the ways you have mothered yourself and others during a deadly pandemic.
    • Ask for a vision or wishes from your family for the year ahead.
    • Carve out a minimum of an hour, but hopefully more, of alone time.
    • Keep it real and remember it has been an incredible year, and you can feel all of your feelings on this day and beyond.

    Cheers to you, Mother.

     

    Edited by NPN Lauren


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