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  • Lauren Plotkin

    Lauren Plotkin, former Chicago Public School teacher turned blogger, started blogging to document her journey through life, motherhood, and all the craziness in between. She tries to approach life with a sense of humor (and maybe a little bit of wine) and loves sharing her experiences—the good, the bad and the ugly—with her readers. You can find more of Lauren's writing at www.myplotofsunshine.com.

    5 things moms should never say to other moms

    Whether you're a new mom or a veteran with three kids under you belt, don't say these five things to other moms.

    Motherhood will make you feel every single emotion possible, including some emotions you didn't even know existed. But there's nothing like the anger/annoyance of an unnecessary comment from another mother. You know, someone who is going or has gone through the very thing you're going through, but somehow feels the need to express disdain or criticize the job you're trying your best at.

    So here are 5 things moms should never say to other moms:

    1. "Just wait." The problem with this simple two-word phrase is that it's never followed up with things like, "Just wait till your kid starts bringing you margaritas, it's so awesome!" Or "Just wait, in a couple months, you're gonna be able to sleep in until 9am and your 2 year old will totally be able to make pancakes on his own." Nope. Just wait is almost always followed by something negative and ain't nobody got time for that.
    2. "You don't feed your kid all organic?" Girl, are you buying my groceries? Because if not then please STFU. I'll feed my kid the best I possibly can but that might not include organic everything. And you know what, you and my kid will be just fine.
    3. "You look so tired." An appropriate response to that comment would be, "And you look so old." Kidding! Not really. At some point, we all look haggard, run down or tired, so there's no need to point it out.
    4. "You're going back to work/You're staying at home with your child?" GASP! Moms need to give other moms credit for whatever decisions they make with regard to working/staying at home. Period.
    5. "My kids would never do that." Right. Because you are a perfect parent with perfect kids. Maybe your kids would never do that but I am sure they did something else equally as bad. So please, get off your high horse and walk among us normal moms.

    So what should you say to other moms? A couple ideas:

    * "Can I get you a refill on that mimosa?"

    * "You look amazing and I totally can't even see the spit up on your shirt!"

    Related articles:
    7 thoughts a stay at home mom has every day
    The pros and cons of moving to the suburbs
    13 signs you might be a Chicago mom



    Lauren Plotkin

    Lauren Plotkin, former Chicago Public School teacher turned blogger, started blogging to document her journey through life, motherhood, and all the craziness in between. She tries to approach life with a sense of humor (and maybe a little bit of wine) and loves sharing her experiences—the good, the bad and the ugly—with her readers. You can find more of Lauren's writing at www.myplotofsunshine.com.





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