Jump to content


  • Fiona Royer

    Fiona Royer lives in Lincoln Park with her husband, Randall, and their three young children. Originally from the U.K. with a business and creative background, she now works in the Chicago philanthropic community. She believes that giving is the key to a fulfilling life.



    Fiona Royer

    Fiona Royer lives in Lincoln Park with her husband, Randall, and their three young children. Originally from the U.K. with a business and creative background, she now works in the Chicago philanthropic community. She believes that giving is the key to a fulfilling life.

    Encouraging a love of writing in a world of emojis

    Sign in to follow this  
    Teach even the youngest child the joy of expressing yourself using the written word with these tips.

     

    In a world dominated by likes and emojis, how do you encourage a love of writing in your kids? My traditional, British self has been pondering just this question.

    Writing provides the means for children to communicate and to express themselves. There are many ways to help your child feel not only the empowerment that comes from writing but the fun that can come with it, too—at any age.

    [Related: Enlist the kids in sorting and donating unwanted stuff]

    The very young
    A child is never too young to embark upon their writing journey. To set the foundation, develop a culture that embraces stories and words.

    • We’ve all heard the directives that we should read with our kids daily. That’s because it’s effective in allowing them to develop in all sorts of ways, including seeing the power of words. There are many free book readings at local libraries and bookstores to take advantage of.
    • Playing "spot the letter" games can occur just about anywhere: at the store, on a road trip, or in a restaurant. It’s amazing how quickly a toddler catches on.
    • Making an activity of "writing" letters allows little ones to scribble "words" on notes to family. Allowing them to help purchase stamps for their own mailings makes this a multi-faceted activity.

    Emerging writers
    To engage your emerging writer’s interest, make writing a fun, creative project.

    • Starting with a simple ‘thank you” and signature on a card, then adding the recipient’s name, and building up to more complex notes of gratitude, is a satisfying transition.
    • Lists of all kinds can boost your youngster’s confidence as they quickly fill a page with words: shopping list, menu, or what to take on a trip to the moon. Keep cheap notepads handy for when the inclination arises.
    • Allow your budding writer to choose some special writing tools. Luminous gel pens and sparkly stickers make projects especially appealing. 
    • Start to introduce youngsters to the players in the book world. The annual Printers Row Lit Fest has many child-friendly activities. Don’t underestimate the power of meeting a real, live author.

    [Related: A British expat mom on teaching kids manners]

    Budding authors

    • Writing poetry is a way to allow youngsters to express themselves without the restrictions of conventional prose. Chicago has a wonderful resource in the Poetry Foundation, with a children’s library to encourage all manner of verse. 
    • Creating comics is a less intimidating way of developing writing skills. Even those who do not identify themselves as writers can be swept up in this storytelling medium, and before long, they’ve assigned a substantial amount of words to a character and fleshed out a plot.
    • Task your child with filing a news report. It could focus on a school event or a call to save the planet—whatever they feel passionate about and want to share. Finding an outlet for their piece can bring their story to life: send it to grandparents or submit it to a school magazine.
    • Encourage fictional stories as a way not just to build formal writing skills, but to develop imaginations and explore ideas. Use story prompts (objects found around the house or pictures from magazines) to kick-start the process. Story maps can be a good first step to determining what they want to say, and eliminates the overwhelming presence of a blank page.

    However you choose to develop your child’s writing skills, the important thing is to create excitement around words. To begin with, accuracy is not the primary goal, but instead, simply encourage your pupil just to put pen to paper. Seeing the results of their work will build confidence and encourage more practice, which in turn will allow youngsters to hone their skills. Above all, share a love of words and the writing will come.

    Sign in to follow this  

    More related articles

    Make kindness a daily act with your kids

    Incorporating kindness and generosity into your family's daily routine ensures these habits will likely stick.

    You can make eating out with your kids actually enjoyable

    Help your kids develop the patience and manners to make a meal out more enjoyable for everyone.

    Why I follow the Montessori method to combat bullying

    The Montessori approach to dealing combat bullying helps children develop respect and empathy from the moment they begin interacting with the world

    Supporting your gifted child during Covid: focus on growth and take a step back

    Parents of gifted children encounter unique challenges when it comes to keeping their gifted children engaged.



Privacy Policy Membership Terms

© 2021 Neighborhood Parents Network of Chicago

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Thank you for visiting our site. Browsing this site is an acceptance of our We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. and Terms of Use.